Diet for Climate: How your food choices can mitigate climate change

Climate change impacts food security which can lead to hunger.

This was stressed by Greenpeace Southeast Asia Executive Director Yeb Saño during the “Ship Ahoy: Diet for Climate” event on February 15, 2018 held onboard the Greenpeace Rainbow Warrior Ship.

The said event aimed to promote eating more fruits and vegetables and less meat because a plant-based diet can mitigate climate change as it generates relatively low greenhouse gasses compared to the meat industry.

According to DOST Asst. Scientist Dr. Imelda Agdeppa of the Food and Nutrition Research Institute, there is a problem of under and over nutrition as well as nutrient deficiency in the Philippines. This is due to the decrease in the intake of fruits and vegetables; and in contrast a slight increase of meat intake.

Greenpeace Food and Ecological Agriculture Campaigner Virginia Benosa-Llorin mentioned that in a commissioned survey, seven out of ten Filipinos are meat eaters with meat being tasty as one of the reasons why they prefer it over vegetables.

To demonstrate that food can be healthy and tasty at the same time, Rainbow Warrior Chef Daniel Bravo, Chef Giney Villar of Feliza Taverna Y Cafe, and TV personality Love Añover-Lianko showed how to prepare meatless recipes.

Chef Daniel said that whatever is good for you is good for the environment as he presented his version of ceviche or kinilaw using mung beans (mongo) as the main ingredient. He called the dish “fruits of the earth” and described it as a nutritional symbiotic ecosystem.

Chef Giney encouraged the eating of raw, “living” food; to be familiar with the food that we eat; and to eat local. She created a fruit chocolate dip made from tablea, fried and green pinipig, and muscovado.

Meanwhile, Love Añover, as a mother, stressed the importance of making healthy food attractive for kids and teaching them how to eat and prepare healthy dishes. She came up with a salad dressing using honey, mustard, calamansi, pepper, and salt.

“Ship Ahoy: Diet for Climate” was part of the Greenpeace Southeast Asia Philippine Leg Rainbow Warrior Ship Tour. The tour will be highlighting the real impacts of climate change in the country and, at the same time, celebrate solutions towards climate resilience and resistance.

 

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Hating on Veggies

Why do kids hate vegetables so much?

Chef Giney Villar said it’s because they’re not really exposed to it. Busy parents resort to easy to prepare processed food and convenient takeaways. The influence of fastfood advertising doesn’t help. I remember attending a baby’s christening celebration held at a fastfood chain. Children learn early on that unhealthy food is the best for them.

To promote healthy and sustainable eating among parents and school children, demonstrate healthy and sustainable ways of cooking food for children, and come up with simple doable list of activities for children and their parents on how they can eat healthy and help in climate change mitigation with their food choices, #IAmHampasLupa Ecological Agriculture Movement together with Greenpeace organized the “Healthy Eats and Treats School Caravan” at West Fairview Elementary School on February 3, 2018.

Part of the event was a cooking demo by Chef Giney who introduced how to prepare tasty tofu patties. Just mix ground tofu, a little flour, grated carrots, chopped onions and onion leaves, plus salt to taste. Then it’s ready for frying. Chef Giney likewise showed how to make spaghetti sauce out of real ingredients – a mix of tomato paste, eggplant, carrots, onion, garlic, salt, sugar, and oil. Really, this aversion towards veggies can be prevented if we try to be a little more creative with our cooking.

 

 

During the school caravan, I asked the participating students about their favorite fruit and vegetable. Their answer, apple and squash. The most hated veggie, as expected, is ampalaya (bitter gourd). All of a sudden, a group of kids started chanting “chicken joy.” We had fish and pinakbet (Filipino vegetable dish) for lunch and I noticed not a lot of the kids finished the pinakbet. These say a lot about the current generation’s eating habit.

It’s not too late, though. As Chef Giney said, we can actually train our taste buds. Our tongues are so used to artificial food with high salt and high sugar content but we can start lessening our intake of these and slowly transition to healthier more plant-based diet. We do this for the sake of our bodies and the planet.

January in Photos

Challenged myself to take at least one photo each day. It wasn’t as easy as I thought it would be. There would be days where I was uninspired or there was just nothing to take a photo of. But what I liked about this self-imposed challenge is I became more observant and I started looking at things around me with fresh eyes.

Here’s my random line-up. 1. New Year fireworks 2. expanse of rice field 3. office table 4. a man in the dark 5. plate of Pad Thai 6. line of motorcycles 7. a looking-away selfie 8. an old couple holding hands 9. Makati buildings 10. colleagues 11. view from the side mirror 12. grapes 13. Greenpeace wall 14. protest art 15. signage 16. an empty park 17. vintage windows and ceiling 18. elevator ceiling lights 19. foliage 20. the sky through a wired fence 21. early morning view from my window 22. Philippine map 23. BGC street art 24. fluorescent lamp 25. brainstorming notes 26. traffic 27. leaves bathed in the rain 28. billboard 29. pedestrians waiting 30. wall art 31. the night sky and a dot of moon

 

No Straw! No Straw!

It’s silly but I actually dreamt about this. I requested that my drink be served without a straw. My drink arrived with a freakin’ plastic straw! I wake up and the same thing happens in my waking world. Geez, just remove the straw then, what’s the big deal? Well, we’re unnecessarily creating waste which could have been avoided at the very beginning. It’s recycled anyway? Only 10% of plastic produced globally is recyled. Most of it is trashed and ends up in the ocean forming the Great Pacific garbage patch, a collection of marine debris mostly plastic. We create biodegradable plastics but they don’t readily decompose and some become tiny bits also known as microplastics.

January is the Zero Waste Month in the Philippines and I wish we could channel even a little of Lauren Singer’s effort in striving for a zero waste lifestyle. Or maybe we should start segregating our wastes into 34 categories like the town of Kamikatsu in Japan. But really, segregating wastes into biodegradable and non-biodegradable could already make a difference.  Garbage dumped in landfills can significantly be reduced if the biodegradables are composted.

We used to have just one garbage bin in the office. I felt bad whenever I see the garbage all mixed up. After work, when I leave the building, I see these piles of garbage bags and these men sorting through the waste, probably looking for recyclables they could salvage and sell. Again, segregating wastes into biodegradable and non-biodegradable would make life easier for them. So that’s what I proposed and I’m glad people in the office obliged. I didn’t want to impose too much.

Waste segregation is very basic but you would be surprised how it can get complicated. We don’t exactly have a proper system for waste management. We have the policy in place but lack the political will to fully implement it. And there are much more important things to think about. Heck, environmental issues should be prioritized and addressed but that’s just me.

In a developing country like the Philippines, where poverty is still pretty much part of life, how can you ask people to avoid single use sachet contributing to plastic pollution when that’s what they can afford. Same with patronizing organic food or sustainable and environment-friendly products, which are relatively more expensive. My friends and I were talking about this one time, relating it to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. If people can barely satisfy their basic needs, you can’t expect them to care for the plight of the environment. On the other hand, why do smart, caring people ignore environmental issues? Why can’t those who can take action?

At the beginning of this year, I wrote “Note to Self” to remind myself to breathe and let go. But as an environmentalist, sometimes I can’t help feeling frustrated. The more you know, the more you care, the more you suffer. You’re labeled anti-development. Or they think you’re just exaggerating or over reacting. Add to that the fact that environmental defenders are being killed! Why did I decide to be an environmentalist, haha!

Because as Helen Keller puts it, “I am only one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do something that I can do.” I guess, that’s one thing I can do. Raise awareness through my writing, through the environmental initiatives I participate in, through my lifestyle.

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Photo by Jason Quema

It’s funny how my friends remark, “Ryan will get angry” when I see them using single-use plastic. At least they’re more aware, I suppose. And maybe one of these days, they would also say, “No straw, please.”

Note to Self

When are you going to die? Ten years from now? Tomorrow? Today? Who knows? The point is, death will eventually come so carpe diem! Seize the day! Make the most of every moment.

Makes you want to not sweat the small stuff because in the grand scheme of things, these inconveniences, and annoyances, and feelings of sadness, even joy, are transient. This too shall pass.

Most of the stuff you fuss about wouldn’t really matter a year from now. So focus on what matters. Be happy where you are. Think of what you already have rather than those that you don’t. After all, this desire to want to have this and that will never be satisfied.

Choose kindness and compassion. Be more understanding. Be patient. Walk a mile in someone else’s shoes. Everyone is fighting their own battle.

Be at peace with the fact that life is imperfect and unfair. And there are circumstances beyond your control. Let go and dwell on what you can change, your sphere of influence. Choose your battles wisely.

Here’s to a fruitful and awesome 2018!

Read “Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff… and it’s all small stuff” by Richard Carlson for more simple ways to keep little things from taking over your life.

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My Top 10 Posts for 2017

Whether it’s due to right timing, the topic, extra effort in sharing, or sheer luck, here’s a roundup of my posts with the most views this year. Yay!

10. Teachers Undergo Creative DRR Workshop – This is our HANDs! action plan focusing on creative DRR. What is HANDs? Check out number 9!

9. HANDs! Project: Looking back and looking forward – An account of my experience in Phuket, Thailand and Kobe, Japan as a fellow of HANDs! Project which is a research fellowship on disaster and environmental education.

8. Re-visiting Vietnam – Travel thoughts about my quick trip to Ho Chi Minh.

7. Filipino Youth Beyond Paris (and yes, youth pa rin ako) – This is about a climate change conference I attended. Or a desperate claim that I’m still young.

6. Advocating for ecological agriculture and mindful consumption – Thanks again, Rappler, for giving me the opportunity to share my advocacy.

5. SuperAdobe Construction with Super Volunteers – A fun volunteering experience.

4. Part of the Horde – To my dismay, I bought my first smartphone.

3. A Plastic Tale – Campaigning against plastic waste.

2. SenseCampPH zeroes in on Sustainable and Livable Cities – This year, we organized the first ever SenseCamp in the Philippines.

1. No longer the Baguio we used to know – Baguio, my hometown, is one of the favorite tourist destinations in the county. It’s sad how it turned to what it is now.

FotoJet

 

The abyss that is Black Mirror

Imagine a world where you rate people you meet on the street with five stars or less depending on your encounter. A world where a simple hashtag can judge evil people to death. A world where you can literally block people and won’t be bothered anymore as you no longer can hear nor see them.

Sounds like Science fiction but Black Mirror, a British-American TV series tackling the dark side of technology, paints a picture of a grim world that is similar to real life. It is fascinating and scary at the same time.

There’s a story about implants that can record everything a person sees, an individual recreated from his social media profile, a woman being hunted down with people just watching and taking a video on their mobile phones.

The narrative, the acting, and the production, I would rate as impressive. And I like how it’s also some kind of a social commentary on how the black mirror, the very thing you’re reading this from, pervasive as it is in our lives can lead to dystopia. Guess what, it’s not a distant future we’re talking about. It is here. Watch a few episodes and you’ll agree with me.

It made me wonder about people putting so much effort on their well-curated but fake social media profile. About online bashing; those easily condemning, putting judgement, and even cursing to death people they barely know. About our obsession over talents shows. About manipulating reality. About poetic justice. About the loss of privacy.

We’re doomed! Black Mirror made sure of that. It’s entertaining, nonetheless. And it may help us re-evaluate how we use technology and maybe, somehow, change our destined future.

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